1913 First Pattern Lady’s Wall Auto-wheel

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To pedal an ordinary cycle for a single hour in, say, a 10 miles run, is a tiring ordeal for many members of the ‘weaker sex.’ But a lady Auto-wheelist can complete a refreshing and restful 50 miles trip in about three hours – travelling at from 16 to 20 miles an hour with the most delightful ease.

The Auto-wheel engine by its own force automatically drives the cycle forward at a pace that is exhilarating yet perfectly safe. This question of labour less propulsion and increased speed is vitally important, because, when cycling in company any lady Auto-wheelist can ‘keep up the pace’ with the swiftest rider of the party all the while feeling quite comfortable and cool, happy in the knowledge that her appearance and pose are both graceful and pleasing.

On account of its light weight, extreme simplicity, and absolute reliability, the Wall Auto-wheel is particularly suitable for lady devotees of the wheel who like to ride from place to place when out shopping or making social calls. Nurses who have a daily visiting round to make, and girls who have to journey to far-off schools, will find the Auto-wheel of priceless service. So will delicate and elderly ladies who are physically incapable of pedalling an ordinary cycle in order to enjoy a ride awheel in the country.

Mis Muriel Hind, a motor cycling expert of world-wide repute, writing in ‘Motor Cycling,’ states that: “A cycle fitted with an Auto-wheel is quite easy to ride and steer. It is as near ‘push the button and the deed is done’; as ever a motor could be.”

– Auto-wheel catalogue description for the ‘Lady’s Model’

Despite initial opposition to women riding bicycles – and therefore adapting their costume to suit riding conditions – by 1912, with suffragettes constantly in the news, British society had at last embraced the concept of female cyclists, motorcyclists and drivers. This was in no small part due to the cycle industry wishing to increase their market share. The Wall Auto-wheel was a radical new idea, and one that was eminently suitable for lady riders. Much of the company’s advertising featured smiling women riding their Wall Auto-wheels

Note that in mixed company, a female rider would ride behind the male rider …although, in the illustration above, this was because the male rider was the King of England!

Wall Aurowheel 1913

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1913 First Pattern Wall Auto-wheel

Option of Fitting to Lady’s or Gent’s Bicycle

(Now sold)

 

 

 

 

The First Pattern Wall Auto-wheel was available to the public from August 1912 until 1913. The first cyclemotor of its kind, it was received very enthusiastically by the public and motoring press alike, and demand far outstripped supply. BSA was awarded the contract to make them, with the 1914 BSA model becoming the standard design. Today, 95% of the Wall Auto-wheels on the road are the Second BSA pattern made from 1914 onwards.

The is particular example is fitted to a Lady’s Machine …although removing it and fitting it to a different bicycle takes only five minutes.

The only requirement for fitting to a bicycle is that it does not have an enclosed chaincase, as it clips to the rear stays.

I will sell it with the option of being fitted to the 1919 Popular Raleigh  ‘Model D’ Gents Roadster (below).

 

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 SHORT VIDEO OF WALL-AUTOWHEEL RUNNING

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TO SEE BARRY RIDING THE WALL AUTOWHEEL 

 PLEASE CLICK HERE

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WALL AUTOWHEEEL CATALOGUE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1913 FIRST PATTERN WALLL AUTOWHEEL ENGINE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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